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Latest Posts

 

You are not alone: Why we need more Indigenous writers and characters in Australian YA: with an interview with Ambelin.

" Imagine a world where no mirror ever shows you your own reflection. You search in vain for a glimpse of your face, your eyes, your existence. Instead you are met again and again with blank glass that shows a world without you in it. There are images enough, of other people, of faces and voices and peoples unlike your own. But never of you, never of your face and what it reveals about your hopes and dreams and fears. It is as if you make no impact on the world and have no importance to it. And it leaves you feeling lost. Bewildered. Alone."

 

Difference, Dystopia, and Defiance - read Ambelin's guest post on The Intrepid Reader: "Through the pages of a thousand books, I have glimpsed what is to come. Many of the possibilities that stretch out before the human species are terrifying, while others fill me with hope. I reach for a future where the boundless potential of human beings is matched only by our boundless compassion."


Ever wondered what happens behind the scenes for the writing of The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf? Find out on Ambelin Kwaymullina's blog tour!


  1. Ambelin over at Lauren's Loquacious Lit: "If there's one thing that underlies everything else in the book, I think it's that the end never justifies the means."

  2. Ambelin on the importance of place and visualisation in the book at InkCrush: "It breaks my heart to see the ancient places of the earth destroyed. And we are putting, not just the many ecosystems of the planet, but our own species in jeopardy."

  3. Ambelin over at I Read Therefore I Am: " I think the dystopian field attracted me because it captures both my worst fears and my greatest hopes. In a dystopia, the world has ended, in war or environmental cataclysm or nucear Armageddon. But humanity, somehow, has survived. Life has triumphed, despite humanity's worst qualities, and at least some of those who remain are trying to make a better world than the one that was lost."

  4. An interview with main character Ashala at Treasured Tales for Young Adults: "I want the same thing for the Tribe that I want for all Illegals. I want us to be free. I want no more detention centres, no rhondarite collars around our necks, no enforcers coming to drag us away."

  5. Ambelin over at My Best Friends Are Books: "Ashala’s ancestors were Aboriginal, so I knew she’d have a deep love for the forest that she lives in. And I knew that her connection to country would be a source of strength and courage for her, the same as it is for Indigenous peoples now."

  6. Ambelin on her favourite scenes, over at Forget Me Not: "The walk down the hallway that begins the book. I love this moment because it’s the first scene I ever wrote, the one that drew me into the story. It was also the scene that kept me writing, because I was so afraid for Ash."

  7. Ambelin on Dystopia and the Dreaming at Bad Ass Bookie: "The reality shaped by the Ancestors is one in which everything lives, and where rock, tree, river, hill, animal and human are linked together in a greater pattern of relationships. This pattern moves and shifts, as all life moves and shifts, forming a web of interacting connections that stretches out to enfold our homelands."

  8. Ambelin on the inspiration behind the writing of Ashala Wolf, over at Head Stuck in a Book: "It’s a great responsibility, to tell a story. You owe your characters all your skill and knowledge. And you have to be brave."

  9. Ambelin over at Shiirleyy's Bookshelf:"...  I didn’t want Ashala to be unhappy! In those bad moments, I kept wanting to rescue her, and of course I couldn’t, because that wasn’t where I was in the story. I couldn’t skim over what was happening either – it was important to show what Ashala was thinking and feeling. But it was really upsetting to have to live through that with her."

  10. Mandy's review, over at Vegan YA Nerds: " I appreciated the message this book has to share with us, that we should be taking better care of our world. Ashala obtains permission from the tuart trees in order to live in the Firstwood and the trees share with her images of the past, of nature being destroyed."

  11. Injustice, Dystopias, and The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf over at Book Probe Reviews: "How did I imagine a dystopia? I wish it were harder to imagine than it is. The seeds of future imperfections are here already, existing in our time and all too often made brutally manifest in the collective history of human beings on this planet. But if we carry within us the seeds of our own destruction, then we carry the opposite too." 

Past News:

Perth YA Fans celebrate the launch of The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf at Subiaco Library!
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Walker Books
The Tribe series text © Ambelin Kwaymullina|Cover image© Mircea Bezergheanu/Shutterstock.com
The Tribe logo and book cover design © 2012 Walker Books Australia Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
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